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NIDA

Drugs: Shatter The Myths

Animated version of NIDA's "Drugs: SHATTER THE MYTHS" booklet, which answers teens’ most frequently asked questions about drugs and abuse with scientific facts and engaging images.

Transcript

Music plays

On screen: Image of broken glass appears. Bands of color appears crossing the center of the screen.

On Screen text: Drugs: Shatter the Myths. NIH (logo), National Institute on Drug Abuse (logo)

On Screen: Image of marijuana buds.

On screen text: Topic. Marijuana. Can marijuana be addictive?

On screen: Image of teenage students sitting on bench looking at their smartphones.

On screen text: Yes. For marijuana, around 1 in 11 people who use it become addicted.

Could you be that one?

On screen: A hand holding a marijuana leaf. Red “Fact” badge appears left of center.

On screen text: If you smoke marijuana a lot in your teens, it can lead to problems studying and learning new things, skills you may never get back.

On screen: Teenagers at a party. A boy and girl standing next to each other left of center, the girl is smoking a cigarette. Another boy and girl standing right of center, the girl is holding a bottle of beer, the boy is wearing a polo with the company emblem on his chest.

On screen text: Topic. Peer Pressure. Research says that teens who see a lot of smoking in movies are more likely to start smoking themselves. Sometimes characters smoke to look edgy and rebellious… but sometimes it’s just about “product placement.”

On Screen: Yellow pop-up icons appear on the cigarette, bottle and company emblem on the shirt that read “Product Placement.”

On screen text: Companies are trying to get into your head and your pockets.

On screen: Close up of cigarettes left of center.

On screen text: Why do people smoke when they know it’s so bad for them?

Maybe they smoke because they can’t stop.

On screen: Black screen with smoke trail rising from the bottom. Pink “Fact” badge appears left of center.

On screen text: Most people who smoke started before age 18.

On screen: Pink “Did you know?” badge appears left of center.

On screen text: Almost 1 in 10 twelfth graders used a hookah in the past year. A lot of people think it’s less harmful than smoking cigarettes, but many of the health risks are the same.

On screen: Bands of color come onto screen to transition to three teenage girls standing outside two crashed cars. Road flares light the scene pink.

On screen text: Topic. Alcohol. Drinking and driving can add up to tragic endings. In the U.S., about 4,300 people under age 21 die each year from injuries caused by underage drinking, more than 35% in car crashes.

On screen: Green “Fact” badge appears.

On screen text: About 4 in 10 people who begin drinking before age 15 eventually become addicted to alcohol.

On screen: Bands of color come onto screen to transition to a close up of teenage girl sitting in a park looking melancholy.

On screen text: Topic. Medical Consequences.

On screen: Background changes to green behind the teenage girl. Photo of human teeth appear in the middle of the screen.

On screen text: Meth. Meth reduces the amount of protective saliva around the teeth.

On screen: Image of girl and clean teeth are replaced with dirty, diseased teeth right of center.

On screen text: People who use meth also tend to drink a lot of sugary soda, neglect oral care, grind their teeth, and clench their jaws ­– all of which can cause what’s known as “meth mouth.”

On screen: Bands of color come onto screen to transition to a cream colored background of subwoofer pulsing in the background. Black “Did you know?” badge appears left of center.

On screen text: Topic. Quick Facts. You are getting bombarded with messages about drugs in songs and movies. A study of popular music found that about…

On screen: Statistic in green appears.

On screen text: 1 in 3 songs said something about drug, alcohol, or tobacco use.

On screen: Statistic in red appears.

On screen text: 3 in 4 rap songs said something about drug, alcohol, or tobacco use.

On screen: Film strips fade in and out of focus on a cream colored background.

On screen text: And of the top 100 movies over a 9-year period, more than

On screen: Statistic in pink appears.

On screen text: 7 in 10 movies showed characters smoking.

On screen: Statistic in lime green appears.

On screen text: 1 in 3 movies showed people getting drunk.

On screen: Background transitions to lime green.

On screen text: Get the facts, and make your own decisions.

On screen: Background changes to light blue

On screen text: Tobacco. Wrinkles, bad breath, yellow teeth, wheezing, stinky clothes

On screen: Teenage male appears right of center. White lines point to various parts of the body affected by tobacco.

On screen text: Addiction, skin damage, cataracts, wrinkles, mouth cancers, throat cancer, heart disease, lung disease.

On screen: Bands of color come onto screen to transition to a white, open medicine cabinet in a white bathroom. A pink triangle with a white skull and crossbones appears in the medicine cabinet.

On screen text: Topic. Prescription Drugs. Fact. Overdose deaths from prescription drugs have quadrupled since 1999.

On screen: Close up of white pills fill the screen. Yellow “Fact” badge appears left of center.

On screen text: Anyone can overdose on prescription opioids or heroin.

On screen: Close up of white pills fill the screen. Yellow “Fact” badge appears left of center.

On screen text: Anyone can overdose on prescription opioids or heroin.

On screen: Orange “Did you know?” badge appears left of center.

On screen text: Mixing pills with other drugs or with alcohol increases your risk of death from accidental overdose.

On screen: A blurred image of man in a black hooded sweatshirt appears standing against a green brick wall, arms crossed. Image slowly fades into focus.

On screen text: Topic. Drugs & Your Brain. You know they make you fuzzy, but what do drugs do to your brain? Different drugs do different things. But they all affect the brain.

On screen: Red “Did you know?” badge appears in top left corner

On screen text: Repeated drug use can reset the brain’s pleasure meter, so that without the drug, you feel hopeless and sad.

On screen: Image of x-ray of a human skull appears against a black background. Green “Fact” badge appears left of center.

On screen text: Drugs mess with your brain’s wiring and signals.

On screen: Bands of color come onto screen to transition to an image of teen girl sitting on window sill looking out a window. The room is painted yellow.

On screen text: Topic. Treatment. Get Help. Why do people come and go from treatment so much? Does it really work? It may take several rounds of treatment before it sticks. There are different types of treatments to meet your specific needs.

On screen: Bands of color come onto screen to transition to an image of a group of teenagers laughing, three boys and two girls.

On screen text: There is treatment and it works.

On screen:  Image of broken glass appears. Bands of color appears crossing the center of the screen.

On screen text: Call 1-800-662-HELP to get referrals to treatment programs near you.

On screen: Background fades to black. National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week (logo) and Shatter the Myths (logo) appears center screen.

On screen text: For more information, including citations, visit: www.drugabuse.gov/shatterthemyths

Music fades out.

This page was last updated January 2018