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Animated Infographic: Monitoring the Future 2018 Survey Results

Monitoring the Future (MTF) is an annual survey of 8th, 10th, and 12th graders conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, under a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health. Since 1975, the survey has measured drug, alcohol, and cigarette use and related attitudes in 12th graders nationwide. Eighth and 10th graders were added to the survey in 1991.

Transcript

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On screen: Drug related words appear on screen with three human silhouettes on the left and three on the right. In the middle, a red diamond shape appears that reads "Teen Drug Use." A blue banner appears across the bottom that reads "Monitoring the Future 2018."

On screen: Background transitions to red. On screen text: Monitoring the Future is an annual survey of 8th, 10th, and 12th graders conducted by researchers at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, under a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health.

On screen: Background transitions to blue. On screen text: Since 1975, the survey has measured how teens report their drug, alcohol and cigarette use and related attitudes in 12th graders nationwide; 8th and 10th graders were added to the survey in 1991.

On screen: Red box drops down from the top. 

On screen text: 44,482 students from 392 public and private schools participated in the 2018 survey.

On screen: Blue banner appears across the top of the screen that reads "Teens Using Vaping Devices in Record Numbers."

On screen: Light grey background appears with three horizontal vaping device graphics on the right, alongside three boxes on the left of center indicating 8th graders as orange, 10th graders as light green and 12th graders as blue.

On screen text: Past-year vaping. 8th graders at 17.6 percent, 10th graders

at 32.3 percent and 12th graders at 37.3 percent.

On screen text: What do teens say they are vaping?

On screen: The on-screen text shrinks and moves to the top of the screen. A white chart appears with three boxes left of the chart – an orange 8th graders box, light green 10th graders box, and blue 12thgraders box. The vertical scale spans from 5 percent to 35 percent and the horizontal scale includes the categories, "Nicotine," "Marijuana or Hash Oil," and "Just Flavoring.”

On screen: Light Green, blue and orange bars rise vertically above each category. The bars indicate that 15.1 - 25.7 of all three age groups think the vaping device liquid is "Just Flavoring," 4.4 to 13.1 percent think the vaping device liquid is "Marijuana or Hash Oil," and 10.9 percent – 29.7 percent think the vaping device liquid is "Nicotine."

On screen: Red box drops down from the top.

On screen text: Nearly 2 in 5 students in 12th grade report past-year vaping, raising concerns about the impact on brain health and potential for addiction.

On screen: Blue banner appears across the top of a light blue background that reads "Daily Marijuana Use Mostly Steady." Three marijuana leaves graphics appear in various sizes. Three boxes appear on the bottom indicating 8th graders as orange, 10th graders as light green and 12th graders as blue.

One screen text: 2018. 8th graders at 0.7 percent, 10th graders at 3.4 percent and 12th graders at 5.8 percent.

On screen: Red box drops down from the top.

On screen text: Five-year trends in daily marijuana use remains steady for 10thand 12th graders but shows a decline in 8th graders.

On screen: Blue banner appears across the top of a light blue background that reads "Daily Marijuana Use Mostly Steady." A white chart appears with a horizontal scale from 2008 to 2018 and a vertical scale of 2 percent to 10 percent. Three boxes appear left of center indicating 8th graders as orange, 10th graders as light green and 12th graders as blue. An orange line graph crosses the chart, peaking at 1.5 percent in 2011 followed by a light

green graph on top, peaking at 4.5 percent in 2013 and then a blue graph on top of both peaking at 6.8 percent in 2011.

On screen: Red box drops down from the top.

On screen text: Past-month vaping of nicotine or marijuana jumped across all grades. Past-month use of marijuana is steady as cigarette use declines.

On screen: A light grey background is revealed, and a blue banner appears across the top of the screen that reads " Teens Vaping Nicotine or Marijuana Increased Across All Grades."

On screen: Underneath the banner a white graph appears with a vertical scale spans from 5 percent to 25 percent and the horizontal scale includes three age categories "8th graders," "10th graders," and "12th graders.” Each grade is split into two groups defined as “Vaping Marijuana” and “Vaping Nicotine,” which appear at the base of the vertical axis of the graph. To the right of the graph, two squares appear. On the top a dark teal box with white text “2017” and on the bottom, a light orange with white text “2018.”

On screen: Dark teal and light orange bars appear to indicate the percentage change in vaping nicotine or marijuana in of each grade for 2017 and 2018. In 2017 teens who indicate vaping nicotine in 8th graders were at 3.5 percent, 10th graders at 8.2 percent, and 12th graders at 11.0 percent. Compared to 2018, 8th graders were at 6.1 percent, 10th graders at 16.1 percent and 12th graders at 20.9 percent.

On screen: In 2017 teens who indicate vaping marijuana 8th graders at 1.6 percent, 10thgraders at 4.3 percent and 12th graders at 4.9 percent Compared to 2018 8th graders at 2.6 percent, 10th graders at 7.0 percent and  12th graders at 7.5 percent.

On screen: A light teal background is revealed, and a blue banner appears across the top of the screen that reads "Teens more likely to use marijuana than cigarettes." Underneath the banner reads "Past-month use among 12th graders." A graph appears with a horizontal scale of dates ranging from 1993 to 2018 and a vertical scale from 5 percent to 40 percent. A marijuana leaf with a green tag that reads "1997, 23.7 percent" appears at the base of the vertical axis of the graph and a green line draws across the chart ending at the far right above 2018 with a green tag that reads "Marijuana, 22.2 percent."

On screen: At the same time, a white line draws across the graph starting at 30 percent in 1993, when it reaches its peak a pack of cigarettes appears with a white tag that reads "1997, 36.5 percent" and then dives down across the remainder of the chart where a second white tag appears and reads "Cigarettes, 7.6 percent" in 2018. This graph shows that in 2018, 12th graders are more likely to use marijuana than cigarettes.

On screen: A light teal background is revealed and a blue banner appears across the top of the screen that reads "Binge Drinking* Rates Steady After Decades of Decline." A line graph with a horizontal scale appears with dates from 1993 to 2018. A vertical scale appears with percentages from 5 percent up to 35 percent. An orange line indicating 8th graders draws

across the graph and a beer bottle appears with a tag that reads "peak, 1996, 13.3 percent" and ends with a tag at 2018 that reads "8thgraders, 3.7 percent." A light green line indicating 10th graders draws across the graph and a beer bottle appears with a tag that reads "peak, 2000, 24.1 percent" and ends with a tag at 2018 that reads "10thgraders, 8.7 percent." Finally, A blue line indicating 12th graders draws across the graph and a beer bottle appears with a tag that reads, “peak, 1998, 31.5 percent” and ends with a tag at 2018 that reads “12th graders, 13.8 percent.”

On screen text:  A disclaimer at the bottom reads "*Binge drinking is defined as having 5 or more drinks in a row in the last 2 weeks."

On screen: Red box drops down from the top.

On screen text: Binge drinking: significant drop in the past five years across all grades.

On screen: A grey background is revealed and a blue banner that reads "Past-year misuse of prescription/over-the-counter vs. illicit drugs." Underneath the blue banner the title, "Prescription/OTC" appears. A white box appears below the title. Percentages appear down the left side of the chart while blue bars extend horizontally from left to right in the white box to visually represent the amounts of prescription, over-the-counter and illicit drugs that were misused in the past year. From top to bottom the chart reads, "5.0 percent, Sedatives/Tranquilizers," "4.6 percent, Adderall®," "3.4 percent, Opioids,” "3.4 percent, Cough/Cold Medicine," and "0.9 percent, Ritalin."

On screen: The chart changes. The title reads "Illicit Drugs" The chart animates similar to the previous chart, percentages are listed down the left of the chart, while blue bars extend from left to right. From top to bottom the chart reads, "35.9 percent, Marijuana/Hashish," "3.5 percent, Synthetic Cannabinoids*," "3.2 percent, LSD," "2.3 percent, Cocaine," "2.2 percent, MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly)," "1.6 percent, Inhalants," and "0.4 percent, Heroin."

On screen text: “Past- year use among 12thgraders” and an asterisk below the chart notes that Synthetic Cannabinoids are called "synthetic marijuana in survey."

On screen: Blue banner unveils across the top of the screen still reads "Past-year misuse of prescription/over-the-counter vs. illicit drugs." Below that, an orange prescription pill bottle appears on the left.

On screen text: Past-year misuse of Vicodin® and OxyContin® among 12th graders has dropped dramatically in the past 15 years.

On screen: The pill bottle and text shrink and moves to the top left under of the below the blue banner. A reference key appears on the left, under the bottle with graphic of a white, scored pill for Vicodin® and a yellow, scored round pill for OxyContin®. A chart appears right of center with the title "Vicodin® versus OxyContin® " at the top. The chart's vertical scale ranges from 1 percent to 11 percent and the horizontal scale has dates from left to right - 2003, 2008, 2013 and 2018. Small white pills fall from the bottle, landing on specific data points. One white pill lands on 2003 and a white tag appears that reads "10.5 percent," the next lands lower on the scale on 2008, the next lands on even lower at 2013 and the last pill lands on 2018 and a white tag appears that reads "1.7 percent."

On screen: At the same time one yellow pill lands on 2002 and a yellow tag appears that reads "4.5 percent," the next lands a little higher on the scale on 2008, the next lands on even lower at 2013 and the last pill lands on 2018 and a yellow tag appears that reads " 2.3 percent." The graph shows a dramatic decrease in the misuse of Vicodin® and OxyContin® over the 15-year span.

On screen: A red box drops down from the top.

On screen text: Students report lowest rates for some drugs since start of the survey. Across all grades, past-year use of illicit drugs other than marijuana holding steady at the lowest levels in over 20 years.

On screen: Red screen changes to dark gray screen with Department of Health and Human Services and NIH National Institute on Drug Abuse logos.

On screen text: For more information, please visit Drugabuse.gov.

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This page was last updated April 2019