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NIDA

MDMA (Ecstasy)

Synthetic Cathinones ("Bath Salts")

What are synthetic cathinones?

Synthetic cathinones, more commonly known as "bath salts," are synthetic (human-made) drugs chemically related to cathinone, a stimulant found in the khat plant. Khat is a shrub grown in East Africa and southern Arabia, and people sometimes chew its leaves for their mild stimulant effects. Synthetic variants of cathinone can be much stronger than the natural product and, in some cases, very dangerous (Baumann, 2014).

MDMA (Ecstasy) Abuse

Describes the science behind MDMA (ecstasy) abuse, including what it does to the brain, whether it is addictive, and the latest research regarding prevention and treatment of MDMA.

Published: March 2006

MDMA (Ecstasy or Molly)

MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine), popularly known as ecstasy or, more recently, as Molly, is a synthetic, psychoactive drug that has similarities to both the stimulant amphetamine and the hallucinogen mescaline. It produces feelings of increased energy, euphoria, emotional warmth and empathy toward others, and distortions in sensory and time perception.

MDMA was initially popular among White adolescents and young adults in the nightclub scene or at “raves” (long dance parties), but the drug now affects a broader range of users and ethnicities.

Monitoring the Future 2015 Survey Results

NIH’s 2015 Monitoring the Future survey shows long term decline in illicit drug use, prescription opioid abuse, cigarette and alcohol use among the nation’s youth.
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NIDA redesigns Easy to Read and Learn the Link websites for mobile devices

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has redesigned two of its websites, Easy to Read and Learn the Link, for use on mobile devices.


Warning from Europe: "Superman" pills

An alert was recently issued in The Netherlands warning about pills with a distinctive Superman logo, sold as MDMA (also called ecstasy or Molly) but actually containing a lethal dose of another substance, PMMA (paramethoxymethylamphetamine). These pills have not been reported in the U.S., but four people in the UK are thought to have died after taking these pills.

“Molly”

Molly—slang for “molecular”—refers to the pure crystalline powder form of the club drug MDMA (3-4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine), which in pill form is known as ecstasy. Molly, which is usually purchased in capsules, has seen a surge in interest in the past few years, being celebrated frequently by popular music artists. MDMA in any form produces energy and euphoria in users but also may dangerously affect body temperature and cause confusion, depression, and sleep problems.

MDMA can be fatal in warm environments

A moderate dose of MDMA, commonly known as Ecstasy or Molly, that is typically nonfatal in cool, quiet environments can be lethal in rats exposed to conditions that mimic the hot, crowded, social settings where the drug is often used by people, a study


Dr. Marilyn Huestis Q & A: Matching Drug Effects to Drug Concentrations

Dr. Marilyn Huestis of NIDA’s Intramural Research Program talks about conducting research on drug effects with human subjects, developing tests to help law enforcement identify drugged drivers, and an assay to help identify children whose prenatal exposure to anti-HIV drugs may put them at risk for adverse developmental outcomes.

Stimulants in “Bath Salts” Produce Effects Similar to MDMA

Mephedrone and methylone, two stimulants commonly found in designer drugs such as “bath salts,” act on the brain much like MDMA (Ecstasy).

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