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Panel Members: Philadelphia, PA Location, May 2012

Long Day's Journey into Night

By Eugene O'Neill

American Psychiatric Association 165th Annual Meeting Location Panel Members:

Herbert D. Kleber, M.D.

Dr. Herbert Kleber is Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Division on Substance Abuse at Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute.

Before founding the Division in 1992, he served for two and a half years as the Deputy Director for Demand Reduction at the Office of National Drug Control Policy in the White House under President George H. W. Bush and Director William Bennett. Prior to that, Dr. Kleber was Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine (1966–1989) where he founded the Substance Abuse Treatment Unit. Currently he oversees research on new medications to treat cocaine, heroin, prescription opioids, or marijuana problems.

Dr. Kleber is an author of more than 275 papers, chapters, and books dealing with substance abuse; the co-editor of the American Psychiatric Press’ Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment; and a member on 6 national boards. He has received numerous awards, is listed as one of the “Best Doctors in America,” and was elected in 1996 to be a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.

Charles P. O’Brien, M.D., PhD

Charles P. O'Brien, a native of New Orleans, earned M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Tulane University. He received residency training at Harvard, Tulane, University of London, and University of Pennsylvania in internal medicine, neurology, and psychiatry. As Chief of Psychiatry at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center, he was responsible for more than 9,000 psychiatric patients. Despite this large clinical responsibility, he was able to establish and direct a clinical research program that has had a major impact on the treatment of addictive disorders. His research group has been responsible for numerous discoveries described in more than 500 publications that have elucidated basic information on the nature of addiction and improved the results of treatment for addictive disorders. His work involves discovery of central nervous system changes involved in relapse, new medications, behavioral treatments, and instruments for measuring the severity of addictive disorders. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 1991 and has received numerous awards including an honorary doctorate from the University of Bordeaux, the Eddy award for research from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence (2003), American Psychiatric Association Research Award (2000), the Gold Medal Research Award from the Society of Biological Psychiatry (2010), and the Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health from the Institute of Medicine (2010).

Nora D. Volkow, M.D.

Dr. Nora D. Volkow became Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institutes of Health, in May 2003. NIDA supports most of the world's research on the health aspects of drug abuse and addiction.

Dr. Volkow's work has been instrumental in demonstrating that drug addiction is a disease of the human brain. As a research psychiatrist and scientist, Dr. Volkow pioneered the use of brain imaging to investigate the toxic effects of drugs and their addictive properties. Her studies have documented changes in the dopamine system affecting the actions of frontal brain regions involved with motivation, drive, and pleasure and the decline of brain dopamine function with age. She has also made important contributions to the neurobiology of obesity, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and the behavioral changes that occur with aging.

Dr. Volkow was born in Mexico, attended the Modern American School, and earned her medical degree from the National University of Mexico in Mexico City, where she received the Premio Robins award for best medical student of her generation. Her psychiatric residency was at New York University, where she earned the Laughlin Fellowship Award as one of the 10 Outstanding Psychiatric Residents in the USA.

Dr. Volkow spent most of her professional career at the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, where she held several leadership positions including Director of Nuclear Medicine, Chairman of the Medical Department, and Associate Director for Life Sciences. In addition, Dr. Volkow was a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Associate Dean of the Medical School at the State University of New York-Stony Brook.

Dr. Volkow has published more than 440 peer-reviewed articles and more than 75 book chapters and nonpeer-reviewed manuscripts, and has also edited three books on the use of neuroimaging in studying mental and addictive disorders.

During her professional career, Dr. Volkow has been the recipient of multiple awards, including her selection for membership in the Institute of Medicine in the National Academy of Sciences and the International Prize from the French Institute of Health and Medical Research for her pioneering work in brain imaging and addiction science. She was recently named one of Time magazine's "Top 100 People Who Shape our World" and was included as one of the 20 people to watch by Newsweek magazine in its "Who's Next in 2007" feature. She was also included in Washingtonian magazine's 2009 list of the "100 Most Powerful Women" and named "Innovator of the Year" by U.S. News & World Report in 2000.

Perelman School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania Location Panel Members:

Lee Kim Erickson, M.D.

Dr. Erickson joined the University of Pennsylvania Health System as the chief quality and patient safety officer at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center in February 2010 and also serves as an associate professor of clinical family medicine and community health at the University of Pennsylvania. Before moving to Philadelphia, she was the medical director for quality and interim chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the West Penn Hospital – Forbes Regional Campus in Pittsburgh, PA. From 2005 to 2007 she also served as the project director for a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration grant to implement the Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment paradigm in the West Penn Allegheny Family Medicine Residency practice. Dr. Erickson is a graduate of the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and did her internship and residency at the Brown University/Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island Family Medicine Residency Program. She is board certified in Family Medicine and has been an active residency teaching faculty member throughout her career. Over the years, Dr. Erickson has taught primary care physicians to care for patients with addiction disorders in multiple graduate medical education programs. She has written curricula on substance abuse for physicians in training including the 2009 national curriculum in substance use disorders for the American Academy of Family Physicians. She has spoken on the care of patients with addiction disorders at local and national meetings including the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine annual forum and on HBO. She has also provided care for opiate-dependent patients as a suboxone-waivered primary care physician since 2007.

A. Thomas Mclellan, Ph.D.

A. Thomas McLellan, Ph.D. has recently returned to his position as CEO of the Treatment Research Institute (TRI) in Philadelphia, a translational research and implementation science organization that he co-founded in 1992. TRI’s mission is to turn research findings into practical and marketable interventions, services and policies to reduce the substance abuse problems affecting families, communities, businesses, schools, and healthcare systems. Prior to his recent return to TRI, Dr. McLellan served as the deputy director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy where he co-authored Mr. Obama’s National Drug Control Strategy and developed policies to integrate prevention and treatment of substance use disorders into mainstream care as part of healthcare reform. Previously, Dr. McLellan worked for 35 years as a career researcher at TRI, the Veterans Administration, and the University of Pennsylvania. He has published over 400 articles and chapters on addiction research and has received several distinguished awards including Life Achievement Awards from the American, Swedish, Italian, and British Societies of Addiction Medicine.

Charles P. O’Brien, M.D., PhD

Charles P. O'Brien, a native of New Orleans, earned M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Tulane University. He received residency training at Harvard, Tulane, University of London, and University of Pennsylvania in internal medicine, neurology, and psychiatry. As Chief of Psychiatry at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center, he was responsible for more than 9,000 psychiatric patients. Despite this large clinical responsibility, he was able to establish and direct a clinical research program that has had a major impact on the treatment of addictive disorders. His research group has been responsible for numerous discoveries described in more than 500 publications that have elucidated basic information on the nature of addiction and improved the results of treatment for addictive disorders. His work involves discovery of central nervous system changes involved in relapse, new medications, behavioral treatments, and instruments for measuring the severity of addictive disorders. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 1991 and has received numerous awards including an honorary doctorate from the University of Bordeaux, the Eddy award for research from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence (2003), American Psychiatric Association Research Award (2000), the Gold Medal Research Award from the Society of Biological Psychiatry (2010), and the Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health from the Institute of Medicine (2010).