En español
NIDA

Menu

NIDA Notes

image of a highway with blurred lights, indicated movement
a pile of prescriptions that say oxycodone
image of a person blowing into a marijuana breathalyzer device
image of a rendering of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)

In This Section

NIDA Notes keeps you up to date on research advances in the causes, consequences, prevention, and treatment of drug abuse and addiction and HIV/AIDS.

Learn more about NIDA Notes

NIDA Notes Category Graphic

Self-Control Protects Urban Minority Youths From Drug Use and Depressive Mood (July 2014)

Interventions that bolster self-control in childhood and early adolescence might shield ethnic and racial minority adolescents and young adults from the burden of both drug use and depressive mood.

NIDA Notes Category Graphic

Among High School Seniors, Driving After Marijuana Use Surpasses Drunk Driving (July 2014)

Within the 2 weeks prior to responding to a nationwide survey, 28 percent of high school seniors were in a vehicle whose driver had been using marijuana or another illicit drug, or had drunk 5 or more alcoholic drinks.

NIDA Notes Category Graphic

Dr. Antonello Bonci Q & A: Lighting Up the Brain To Shut Down Cocaine Seeking (July 2014)

The Scientific Director of NIDA’s Intramural Research Program talks about switching off animals’ compulsive cocaine seeking by optogenetically activating the prefrontal cortex, and the implications of this work for people. In an accompanying podcast, Dr. Bonci walks viewers through experiments that showed that prefrontal cortex activity levels may constitute a simple switch controlling whether or not animals compulsively seek cocaine.

NIDA Notes Category Graphic

Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks (June 2014)

Two recent studies suggest that genotyping may enable clinicians to base therapies on individual patients’ potential responsiveness to opioid drugs’ therapeutic effects and vulnerability to their harmful effects.

NIDA Notes Category Graphic

New Insight Into How Cues Cause Relapse to Cocaine (May 2014)

A brain response occurs in the nucleus accumbens when rats encounter a cue that they associate with previous cocaine self-administration, but not a cue associated with a pleasurable non-drug experience. Moreover, the response correlates in time and intensity with the animals’ cue-induced relapse to cocaine-seeking.

NIDA Notes Category Graphic

Device Detects Marijuana in Breath Hours After Smoking (May 2014)

Driving under the influence of marijuana is a dangerous public health concern. NIDA researchers have discovered that breath expelled into a Breathalyzer-style collection device contained measurable amounts of THC for up to 2 hours after participants in a recent clinical trial smoked the drug.

NIDA Notes Category Graphic

Although Relatively Few, “Doctor Shoppers” Skew Opioid Prescribing (May 2014)

One out of every 143 U.S. patients who received a prescription for an opioid painkiller in 2008 obtained prescriptions from multiple physicians in a pattern that suggests misuse or abuse of the drugs.

NIDA Notes Category Graphic

Dr. Joni Rutter Q&A: How Basic Science Is Tackling Addiction (May 2014)

One of NIDA’s goals is to try to understand the individual differences that contribute to whether or not someone who takes a drug will become addicted to it. Dr. Rutter’s research focuses on three types of differences: Environmental, developmental, and genetic and epigenetic.

NIDA Notes Category Graphic

Marijuana Use May Promote Nicotine Consumption (April 2014)

Exposing rats to THC increases the likelihood that the animals will later self-administer nicotine. THC-exposed rats are also willing to work harder to obtain nicotine. When extrapolated to people, the findings suggest that THC’s pharmacological impact on the brain may make a person who uses marijuana more vulnerable to developing nicotine addiction, an underappreciated health consequence of marijuana use.

NIDA Notes Category Graphic

In Nationwide Survey, More Students Use Marijuana, Fewer Use Other Drugs (April 2014)

Almost one-third (32 percent) of the roughly 42,000 Monitoring the Future survey respondents reported having used marijuana during their lifetime. However, abuse of many other drugs—methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine, and some prescription medications—declined.

Pages

Get this Publication

    Subscribe to NIDA Notes

     

    Get Articles Via RSS

    Latest Podcast

    Researchers Speak: Dr. Antonello Bonci