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The Staying Power of Multidimensional Family Therapy Description

This graph displays the differences between Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing teens' social and behavioral consequences of drug abuse, as measured by the Personal Experience Inventory.The Staying Power of Multidimensional Family Therapy: Differences between Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing teens' social and behavioral consequences of drug abuse, as measured by the Personal Experience Inventory, were most pronounced a year after the end of treatment.

This bar graph, titled "The Staying Power of Multidimensional Family Therapy," displays the differences between Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing teens' social and behavioral consequences of drug abuse, as measured by the Personal Experience Inventory. The vertical axis shows the average score on problem assessment; the horizontal axis represents different times of assessment.

Before treatment, MDFT had an average score of 28 on problem assessment, while CBT had an average score of 27 on problem assessment.

At the end of treatment, MDFT had an average score of 20 on problem assessment, while CBT had an average score of 27 on problem assessment.

At the 6-month followup of treatment, MDFT had an average score of 18 on problem assessment, while CBT had an average score of 21 on problem assessment.

At the 12-month followup of treatment, MDFT had an average score of 12 on problem assessment, while CBT had an average score of 19 on problem assessment.

Go Back To: Multidimensional Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abuse Offers Broad, Lasting Benefits