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Fewer Girls Are Smoking, But Change Is Uneven Description

This line graph displays how fewer girls (in the eighth grade) are smoking, but change is uneven by measuring racial and ethnic differences, with daily cigarette use on the x-axis and percent using on the y-axis.

This line graph displays how fewer girls (in the eighth grade) are smoking, but change is uneven by measuring racial and ethnic differences, with daily cigarette use on the x-axis and percent using on the y-axis.

From 1991-1994:

  • 24.8 percent of American Indian girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.
  • 6.7 percent of Black girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.
  • 18.7 percent of Mexican American girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.
  • 6.3 percent of Asian American girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.
  • 17.3 percent of White girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.
  • 21.2 percent of Puerto Rican girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.
  • 13.5 percent of Other Latina girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.

From 1995-1998:

  • 34.5 percent of American Indian girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.
  • 9.1 percent of Black girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.
  • 20.4 percent of Mexican American girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.
  • 8.1 percent of Asian American girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.
  • 22.8 percent of White girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.
  • 21.6 percent of Puerto Rican girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.
  • 15.7 percent of Other Latina girls were smoking cigarettes on a daily use.

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