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Compound Suppresses Acute Inflammatory

Compound Suppresses Acute Inflammatory Pain In a protocol designed to simulate acute inflammatory pain from arthritis, mice received a hind-paw injection of the chemical irritant carrageenan, which resulted in swelling. Animals that received oral URB937, as compared to those that did not receive the compound, withstood more radiant heat from a focused beam before withdrawing the swollen paw (Withdrawal Threshold) and withstood longer periods of steady pressure on the paw from a pointed glass cylinder (Withdrawal Latency). Higher doses of URB937 were associated with increased pain tolerance.

Top graph: Bar graph compares how long mice with acute inflammation took to withdraw their paws from a hot surface when untreated and when treated with four doses of URB937. The more URB937 animals received, the longer they left their paws on the surface, from a minimum of 10 seconds (untreated) to a maximum of 60 seconds (3.0 mg/kg).

Bottom graph: Bar graph compares how long mice with acute inflammation took to withdraw their paws from a radiant heat source when untreated and when treated with four doses of URB937. The more URB937 animals received, the longer they left their paws on the surface, from a minimum of 5 seconds (untreated) to a maximum of 25 seconds (3.0 mg/kg).

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