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NIDA

Ciencia de la adicción

Advancing Psychiatric Practice through the Science of Addiction

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a component of the National Institutes of Health, will present a special research track at the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA’s) 166th annual meeting in San Francisco from May 18 to 22.


NIH study sheds light on how to reset the addicted brain

Could drug addiction treatment of the future be as simple as an on/off switch in the brain?


N-Acetylcysteine Postsynaptic Effect Limits Efficacy

Clinical trials of N-acetylcysteine to help people recovering from drug abuse avoid relapse have demonstrated only moderate efficacy. New NIDA-supported research shows that while a low dose of the medication activates receptors associated with lowered drug-seeking behavior, a higher dose appears to activate receptors associated with increased drug-seeking behavior. The result suggests that a medication or combination of medications that stimulate the receptor GluR2/3 and block mGluR5 may work better than N-acetylcysteine alone.

Animation: Building an Anti-Drug Vaccine

The immune system has an extraordinary ability to recognize compounds foreign to the body and eliminate them. NIDA-sponsored scientists are working to harness this ability to create vaccines that will protect individuals against the psychogenic and addictive effects of abused drugs. This animation shows one of the most promising strategies, which has already yielded partial success in producing effective vaccines against nicotine, cocaine, and other drugs.

Dr. David Jentsch Receives the 2011 Waletzky Memorial Award

Dr. J. David Jentsch is the recipient of the 2011 Jacob P. Waletzky Memorial Award for Innovative Research in Drug Addiction and Alcoholism. Dr. Jentsch and colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles, are studying genetic and neurochemical factors that influence individual differences in inhibitory control.

Investigators Map Functional Networks in the Rat Brain

Researchers have mapped the fundamental functional organization of the rat brain and shown that it resembles that of the human brain.

Well-Known Mechanism Underlies Benzodiazepines' Addictive Properties

New research establishes that benzodiazepines cause addiction in a way similar to that of opioids, cannabinoids, and the club drug GHB. The discovery opens the door to designing new benzodiazepines that counteract anxiety but are not addictive.

Women and Sex/Gender Differences Research Program

NIDA’s Women and Sex/Gender Differences Research Program focuses on gender-specific addiction risk factors and treatment needs.

Blending conference translates substance abuse research into practice

Experts will share the latest clinical research with addiction treatment professionals, healthcare providers, policy makers, and others during the April 19th Blending Conference in Atlanta, Georgia.


Study provides clues for designing new anti-addiction medications

Scientists are now one step closer to developing anti-addiction medications, thanks to new research that provides a better understanding of the properties of the only member of the opioid receptor family whose activation counteracts the rewarding effects of addictive drugs.


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