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NIDA

Ciencia de la adicción

Lower Levels of Dopamine-Regulating Receptors Among Novelty Seekers

Describes research results reporting that people who favor novelty have lower-than-average availability of a receptor that inhibits dopamine's release from neurons, which likely stimulates the activity of reward circuits.

Brain Opioid Receptor Levels Predict Time to Cocaine Relapse

Describes study findings revealing that cocaine abusers who maintain high levels of a certain receptor in their brain during early abstinence relapse sooner than abusers whose levels drop.

Crack Cocaine Promotes Progression of HIV Infection to AIDS

Reports on two studies showing a high prevalence of HIV infection and more rapid progression to disability and death among drug abusers.

Brain Adaptation May Dampen Effects of Cocaine

Reports evidence that a cocaine-induced change in the structure of brain cells represents an adaptive response that may limit the drug’s impact.

French Government Honors Dr. Volkow

Announces the 2009 International Prize, awarded by the French Institute of Health and Medical Research, to NIDA Director Dr. Nora D. Volkow.

NIDA Curriculum Piques Students' Interest in Addiction Careers

Describes an eight-module web-based curricula that introduces addition research to graduate students of nursing, dentistry, and medicine.

Dr. Geoffrey Schoenbaum Receives the Waletzky Memorial Award

Announces the recipient of a 2009 award for innovation in research on drug addiction and alcoholism and with a focus on the changes that occur in the brain after exposure to drugs.

Reality Videos Bring NIDA Scientists to Web Site for Teens

Highlights new video clips on NIDA's Web site for teens that explore the dangers of drug abuse and that address questions from youth and their parents on the topic.

Genetic Overlap Between Substance Abuse and Bipolar Disorder

Describes a literature analysis reporting on the prevalence of people with bipolar disorder who also have a substance use disorder and discusses the genetic link that may contribute to this comorbidity.

Peer Interaction Enhances Adolescent Rats' Drug Reward

Describes an animal study reporting that peer interaction enhances adolescent rats’ drug reward and discusses the impact of these findings to future research on drug reward in social context.

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