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NIDA Seeks Applications for Women and Sex/Gender Differences Junior Investigator Travel Awards for CPDD

NIDA plans to provide $750 travel awards to 27 junior investigators to present their research on women or sex/gender differences in any area of drug abuse at the annual meeting of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence (CPDD) in San Juan, Puerto Rico, June 14‒19, 2014. Deadline to apply is December 2, 2013.

Receptor May Underlie Gender Differences in Response to Smoking Cessation

Men benefit more than women from nicotine replacement therapy for smoking cessation because nicotine affects a key neuroreceptor differently in the two sexes, a NIDA-sponsored study suggests. The findings highlight the need for alternative therapies for women smokers, and point to the female hormone progesterone as a potential therapeutic target.

Women and Sex/Gender Differences Research Program

NIDA’s Women and Sex/Gender Differences Research Program focuses on gender-specific addiction risk factors and treatment needs.

Cocaine Craving Activates Brain Reward Structures; Cocaine "High" Dampens Them

Reports on a study that documenting changing emotional and neurobiological responses to cocaine with successive doses during a single session of drug taking.

Reduced Longevity Among Male Heroin Abusers, 1962-1997

Reviews the changing lifespan of heroin abusers as compared with that of the general U.S. population based on 1962-1997 data.

Cocaine Locks Rats Into Unrewarding Behaviors

Describes research with rats to better understand cocaine’s effect on the neural signaling in the learning circuits of the brain.

Methadone Therapy in Prison Benefits Men a Year Out

Describes clinical trial results providing evidence that methadone maintenance to men in prison can pay off in better retention in community treatment and reduced drug abuse following their release.

Marijuana Linked With Testicular Cancer

Reports on a study of close to 400 Washington State men that found that those who use marijuana may increase their risk for developing testicular cancer.
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