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NIDA

Inhalants

Inhalants

Describes to young teens how inhalants, such as hair spray, gasoline, and spray paint, can cause nerve cell damage in the brain that can affect the body in many ways.

Published: January 1997


Read this publication online at the NIDA for Teens Web site »

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Inhalants

Brief Description

Many products readily found in the home or workplace—such as spray paints, markers, glues, and cleaning fluids—contain volatile substances that have psychoactive (mind-altering) properties when inhaled. People do not typically think of these products as drugs because they were never intended for that purpose. However, these products are sometimes abused in that way. They are especially (but not exclusively) abused by young children and adolescents, and are the only class of substance abused more by younger than by older teens. Learn more

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