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Hallucinogens

Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs

Offers the latest research findings on hallucinogens and dissociative drugs, describing what they are, how they are abused, and basic facts about different drugs within this classification of drugs.

Published: March 2001
Revised: February 2015

Hallucinogens

What are hallucinogens?

Hallucinogens are a diverse group of drugs that alter perception (awareness of surrounding objects and conditions), thoughts, and feelings. They cause hallucinations, or sensations and images that seem real though they are not. Hallucinogens can be found in some plants and mushrooms (or their extracts) or can be human-made. People have used hallucinogens for centuries, mostly for religious rituals. Common hallucinogens include the following:

Monitoring the Future 2015 Survey Results

NIH’s 2015 Monitoring the Future survey shows long term decline in illicit drug use, prescription opioid abuse, cigarette and alcohol use among the nation’s youth.
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NIDA redesigns Easy to Read and Learn the Link websites for mobile devices

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has redesigned two of its websites, Easy to Read and Learn the Link, for use on mobile devices.


“N-bomb”

“N-bomb” refers to any of three closely related synthetic hallucinogens (25I-NBOMe, 25C-NBOMe, and 25B-NBOMe) that are being sold as legal substitutes for LSD or mescaline. Also called “legal acid,” “smiles,” or “25I,” they are generally found as powders, liquids, soaked into blotter paper (like LSD) or laced on something edible.

Adolescent Cigarette, Alcohol Use Declines as Marijuana Use Rises

Fewer teens are using cigarettes, alcohol, and most illicit drugs, according to NIDA’s latest Monitoring the Future study. Troubling  trends persist in marijuana use, however, and nonmedical prescription drug use remains a concern.

Elevated Rates of Drug Abuse Continue for Second Year

Illicit drug use in the United States in 2010 was at its highest level since 2002, according to the most recent report from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. A rise in marijuana use drove the increase. A favorable trend of falling cocaine use continued.

NIDA creates easy-to-read website on drug abuse

A new, easy-to-read website on drug abuse designed for adults with a low reading literacy level (eighth grade or below) was launched today by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health.  The si


Hallucinogens

Explains to young teens how hallucinogens affect the brain’s communication centers as well as its ability to control sleep and emotions.

Published: January 1997
Revised: January 2009


Read this publication online at the NIDA for Teens Web site »

High Rates of Illegal Drug Use Among Alcohol-Dependent Adults

Highlights data on the prevalence of rates of illegal drug use and nonmedical use of prescription drugs among adults dependant on alcohol, as compared with the general population.

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