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NIDA

Cocaine

Program Helps Troubled Boys Reduce Substance Abuse

Chronically delinquent boys in Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care reduced their substance abuse more than boys assigned to Community Group Care.

New Class of Regulators for Addiction Genes

New studies show that microRNAs, snippets of RNA implicated in a wide variety of biological processes, are involved in promoting and inhibiting cocaine addiction. The findings could pave a new path for the development of anti-addiction therapies.

Disruption of Neuron Production in Adult Rats Increases Cocaine Taking

Drug abuse may diminish production of new neurons in the brain’s hippocampus and thereby increase vulnerability to drug addiction.

NIH study examines nicotine as a gateway drug

A landmark study in mice identifies a biological mechanism that could help explain how tobacco products could act as gateway drugs, increasing a person’s future likelihood of abusing cocaine and perhaps other drugs as well, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the Nat


Cocaine

Explores with young teens how cocaine changes the way nerve cells communicate in the brain and the negative effects the drug can have on the body.

Published: January 1997
Revised: January 2009


Read this publication online at the NIDA for Teens Web site »

The Brain & the Actions of Cocaine, Opiates, and Marijuana

The first in a 5-part series, offers an understanding of the brain, how the reward center works, and what happens in the brain when a person uses cocaine, opiates (heroine), or marijuana.

Revised: January 2007

High Rates of Illegal Drug Use Among Alcohol-Dependent Adults

Highlights data on the prevalence of rates of illegal drug use and nonmedical use of prescription drugs among adults dependant on alcohol, as compared with the general population.

Drugs Contribute to High Rates of Sexually Transmitted Diseases Among Juvenile Offenders

Describe a study of newly arrested youths where researchers found correlations between the youths' prevalence of these sexually transmitted diseases and their cocaine and marijuana use.

Methylphenidate for Comorbid Cocaine Abuse, ADHD

Describes an inpatient study investigating the effectiveness of sustained-release methylphenidate as a treatment for cocaine-addiction patients with ADHD.

Brain Changes Accompany Cocaine Withdrawal

Summarizes an animal study of the neural changes in the amygdala portion of the brain that occur as a result of cocaine exposure followed by withdrawal of the drug.

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