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NIDA

Trends and Statistics

Teens With Unhealthy Weight-Control Behavior Are More Likely to Abuse Drugs

Highlights data on unhealthy eating behaviors, such as fasting or purging, and substance abuse problems among teens.

Substance Abuse and Sexual Risk Show Town-Gown Divide

Compares data on substance abuse and sexual risk among college students and their peers who do not attend college.

Adolescent Cigarette Smoking Holds at Lowest Recorded Levels

Discusses 2009 prevalence rates of cigarette, alcohol, prescription drug, and illicit drug use among adolescents and discusses trends in use over time.

Some Teens Reporting Nonmedical Use of Prescriptions Develop Disorders

Reports teen drug abuse based on 2006-2007 data from a national survey on drug use and health and compares differences by gender.

High School Seniors Steadily Increase Nonmedical Use of Sedatives Over 15 years

Highlights data from an annual national survey of youth showing a pattern of rising nonmedical use of sedatives among high school seniors.

Steroid Abuse Is a High-Risk Route to the Finish Line

NIDA Director Nora Volkow

Highlights research on the effects of steroid use on the brain and the rest of the body, and stresses the need to educate young people about the serious health risks associated with its use.

From the Director

Hallucinogens and dissociative drugs—which have street names like acid, angel dust, and vitamin K—distort the way a user perceives time, motion, colors, sounds, and self. These drugs can disrupt a person’s ability to think and communicate rationally, or even to recognize reality, sometimes resulting in bizarre or dangerous behavior. Hallucinogens such as LSD and psilocybin cause emotions to swing wildly and real-world sensations to appear unreal, sometimes frightening.

Studies on Combat Related Substance Use and Abuse to be Funded by NIH and VA

Eleven research institutions in 11 states will receive more than $6 million in federal funding from fiscal year 2010 to support research on substance abuse and associated problems among U.S. military personnel, veterans, and their families.


In NIH-Funded Study, Researchers Uncover Early Step in the Cascade of Brain Events Leading up to Addiction

A regulatory protein best known for its role in a rare genetic brain disorder also may play a critical role in cocaine addiction, according to a recent study in rats, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a component of the National Institutes of Health.


Common Mechanisms of Drug Abuse and Obesity

Some of the same brain mechanisms that fuel drug addiction in humans accompany the emergence of compulsive eating behaviors and the development of obesity in animals, according to research funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a component of the National Institutes of Health.


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