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NIDA

Trends and Statistics

Providers Defer HIV Treatment for Injection Drug Users (IDUs)

Providers defer HIV treatment for injection drug users.
English

Prescription Drug Abuse: Young People at Risk

The RX Risk: Roughly 1 in 9 youth abused prescription drugs in the past year.
English

Elevated Rates of Drug Abuse Continue for Second Year

Illicit drug use in the United States in 2010 was at its highest level since 2002, according to the most recent report from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. A rise in marijuana use drove the increase. A favorable trend of falling cocaine use continued.

Tobacco Smokers Have High Probability of Transition to Dependence

First-time smokers have a much higher chance of eventually becoming dependent than first-time users alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine.

Cigarette and alcohol use at historic low among teens

Cigarette and alcohol use by eighth, 10th and 12th-graders are at their lowest point since the Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey began polling teenagers in 1975, according to this year's survey results.


National Institute on Drug Abuse to Announce Results of 2011 Monitoring the Future Survey

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) will hold a press conference on Wednesday, December 14, to announce the results of its 2011 Monitoring the Future survey.


Community Monitoring Systems: Tracking and Improving the Well-Being of America's Children and Adolescents

Describes community systems that monitor the well-being of children and adolescents and lists recommendations that define the next steps for creating and mentoring effective community monitoring systems.

Published: September 2007

Assessing Drug Abuse Within and Across Communities

Provides guidelines for establishing epidemiology networks to monitor and assess drug abuse patterns and trends and emerging drug problems at community and State levels.

Published: September 2006

Letter from the Director

The abuse of methamphetamine—a potent and highly addictive stimulant—remains an extremely serious problem in the United States. According to data from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), over 12 million people (4.7 percent of the population) have tried methamphetamine at least once. NSDUH also reports that approximately 1.2 million people used methamphetamine in the year leading up to the survey.

Letter from the Director

The so-called "club drug" MDMA continues to be used by millions of Americans across the country, despite evidence of its potential harmful effects. 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, or ecstasy) has gained a deceptive reputation as a "safe" drug among its users. This illegal drug, which has both stimulant and psychedelic properties, is often taken for the feelings of well-being, stimulation, and the distortions in time and sensory perceptions that it produces.

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