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Treatment Research

NIH’s “PEERx” for teens to be showcased at Rx Drug Abuse Summit

A unique, new campaign targeting teens will be on exhibit at the first national summit addressing the prescription drug abuse epidemic.


Study provides clues for designing new anti-addiction medications

Scientists are now one step closer to developing anti-addiction medications, thanks to new research that provides a better understanding of the properties of the only member of the opioid receptor family whose activation counteracts the rewarding effects of addictive drugs.


In Animals, Receptor Puts Brakes on Nicotine Consumption

New research suggests that differences in tobacco consumption reflect, in part, differences in the functional efficacy of a specific type of receptor in a pathway of the brain. In animal studies, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with the α5 subunit played a key role in producing aversive responses to nicotine, thereby dissuading further consumption of the drug.

Stimulant Abusers' Regard for Future Improves With Memory Training

Researchers correlate stimulant abusers’ improved performance on a memory training exerc ise with reductions in delay discounting.

Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment: What Works with Offenders

Provides an overview of drug abuse treatment principles derived from research findings in the areas of criminology and drug abuse treatment.

Published: July 2006

Financial Strain Hinders Smoking Cessation

Helping smokers deal with financial problems could improve their chances of staying abstinent after receiving treatment, according to a new study. Participants with the most financial strain had the least success in remaining abstinent.

New Class of Regulators for Addiction Genes

New studies show that microRNAs, snippets of RNA implicated in a wide variety of biological processes, are involved in promoting and inhibiting cocaine addiction. The findings could pave a new path for the development of anti-addiction therapies.

Molecular Alterations of DNA Contribute to Persistence of Memory

In a new series of studies tracing the molecular events that occur in the brain as memories are formed and preserved, researchers find that certain epigenetic changes may promote vulnerability to relapse.

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