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Prevention Research

Prevention Program Reduces Later Risky Sexual Behaviors

Reports on a school-based drug abuse prevention program showing that teens who participate in the program are less likely than their peers to engage in risky sexual behavior as young adults.

Physical Activity May Prevent Substance Abuse

NIDA Director Nora Volkow

Considers the potential role of physical activity on substance abuse prevention and describes some of the research that has been conducted on this emerging area of addiction science.

Prevention Program Averts Initiation of Alcohol and Tobacco Use

Describes a community focused prevention program that aids towns in lowering rates of delinquency, initiation of alcohol and tobacco use, and binge drinking among middle school students.

NIDA Raises the Curtain on Addiction

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) announced today the launch of its Addiction Performance Project, an innovative continued medical education program designed to help primary care providers break down the stigma associated with addiction.


Prevention

Brief Description

NIDA's prevention research program focuses on risks for drug abuse and other problem behaviors that occur throughout a child's development, from pregnancy through young adulthood. Research funded by NIDA and other Federal research organizations - such as the National Institute of Mental Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - shows that early intervention can prevent many adolescent risk behaviors. Learn more

Family Checkup link

Family Checkup

Developed by the Child and Family Center at the University of Oregon, Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse highlights parenting skills that are important in preventing the initiation and progression of drug use among youth.

Cocaine Vaccine Helps Some Reduce Drug Abuse

Reports on the results of a clinical trial that tested the effectiveness of a cocaine vaccine designed as a therapy for cocaine abuse and plans underway for a new study of 300 patients to confirm these results.

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