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NIDA

Health and Medical Professionals

Buprenorphine Plus Behavioral Therapy Is Effective For Adolescents With Opioid Addiction

Reports on a study of adolescents addicted to opioids who responded better to buprenorphine than clonidine in a clinical trial in which all patients also received behavioral therapy.

Brain Mechanism Turns Off Cocaine-Related Memory in Rats

Describes a series of experiments that have added to evidence that a brain enzyme controls key memory processes that link drug experiences, the surroundings in which they take place, and the urge to repeat them.

Walk the Line Is Among 10th Annual PRISM Awardees

Announces the winners of the 10th Annual PRISM Awards, including Walk the Line, a film portraying the life of singer Johnny Cash and his battle with drug addiction.

NIDA's National Advisory Council Welcomes New Members

Introduces four new members to NIDA’s National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse, including Drs. Warren K. Bickel, Ellie E. Schoenbaum, and Marina E. Wolf, and Ms. Janet Wood.

Program Enhances Physician Knowledge on Substance Abuse

Reports on an evaluation of the Chief Resident Immersion Training (CRIT) program to assess its effectiveness in improving knowledge, confidence, and preparedness to diagnose, manage, and teach about substance abuse.

Addiction Science Award Winners Announced

Announces the 2010 high school student recipients of the Addiction Science Awards and describes their winning addiction-focused projects.

Mentoring: A Guide for Drug Abuse Researchers

Discusses the importance of quality mentorship in drug abuse research and offers suggestions for creating a successful mentor and mentee relationship.

Published: November 2009

Letter from the Director

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) — the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) — has been with us for three decades now. Today, an entire generation of young adults has never known a world without HIV/AIDS.

From the Director

Hallucinogens and dissociative drugs—which have street names like acid, angel dust, and vitamin K—distort the way a user perceives time, motion, colors, sounds, and self. These drugs can disrupt a person’s ability to think and communicate rationally, or even to recognize reality, sometimes resulting in bizarre or dangerous behavior. Hallucinogens such as LSD and psilocybin cause emotions to swing wildly and real-world sensations to appear unreal, sometimes frightening.

Resource Guide: Screening for Drug Use in General Medical Settings

Provides clinicians serving adult populations in general medical settings with the tools and procedures necessary to conduct screening, brief intervention, and/or treatment referral for patients who may have or be at risk of developing a substance use disorder.

Published: April 2009
Revised: March 2012

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