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Donating to the National Institute on Drug Abuse

Revised April 2012

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), supports most of the world's research on the health aspects of drug abuse and addiction.  NIDA receives its funding through congressional appropriations.  However, NIDA is also authorized to accept donations to support its research activities.  If you want your donation to be used on a specific type of research, such as to support a specific research study, project, ceremony or other specific use, you may state it in your letter.

How to Donate

Donations are handled through the NIDA Gift Fund by mailing checks or money orders made payable to the
National Institute on Drug Abuse” and sent to:

Financial Management Branch
National Institute on Drug Abuse
6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 5102
Bethesda, MD 20892
USA

What to Include in the Cover Letter

Please send a cover letter or note indicating the donation is to be used to support the mission of the NIDA. In the letter include the donor’s name(s) and address(es).

  • For donations in memory or honor of someone, please include the name of the person and the name(s) and address(es) of individuals you want NIDA to acknowledge.  All donations will be acknowledged with a thank you letter.
  • For donations in support of a specific NIDA research area, please include the name of the lab, office, or research type.

Tax Information

NIDA is a Federal Agency of the United States Government and is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as tax-exempt under 26 U.S.C. 501(c)(3).  Contributions to the NIDA are tax-deductible pursuant to 26 U.S.C. 170.  Potential donors should, however, consult with their tax advisors.

For more information please contact the NIDA Financial Management Branch at (301) 443-6627.

This page was last updated April 2012

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